Category Archives: featured resource

Intergroup Dialogue/Relations Resources

Have you heard the term “Intergroup Dialogue”? Wondering what in the world “IGD” or “IGR” means? The new IGD LibGuide will help you find books, articles and videos on what IGD is, and how people across the world are using it in the classroom.

Browse the Video Collection

Looking for a DVD to watch? Heard about an interesting director and want to see more of their films? You can easily find videos at Case-Geyer by visiting the Video Browsing Guide. You can search for a specific title or director, or you can browse by select genres, directors or actors.

Need more help? You can check out the Video Help Guide to build your own searches, or talk to a Reference Librarian.

CU Libraries Receive High Student Satisfaction Ratings

Colgate students have high levels of satisfaction with the University Libraries, according to the results of the LibQUAL+ survey administered last year. LibQUAL+, a user satisfaction survey developed and tested for reliability and validity by the Association of Research Libraries, has been used by hundreds of academic libraries across the country. It provides Colgate University with library satisfaction measures that can be benchmarked against other colleges and universities, including many members of the Oberlin Group, an association of 80 selective, top-ranked liberal arts colleges in the United States.

Student satisfaction with Colgate library services, facilities and resources is high relative to benchmark scores of the Oberlin Group. The Colgate University Libraries rated higher than the Oberlin Group mean for most survey items, including the overall satisfaction items, “How would you rate the overall quality of the service?” and, “In general, I am satisfied with library support for my learning, research, and/or teaching needs.”

Colgate students are frequent users of the University Libraries and their resources. One in three reported using resources on library premises daily and 82% reported use at least weekly. Consistent with this high use were four performance areas associated with some of the highest levels of satisfaction:

  • Modern equipment that lets me easily access needed information
  • A comfortable and inviting location
  • A getaway for study, learning, or research
  • Contribution to the intellectual atmosphere of the campus

Colgate students, faculty, and staff should be proud of the level to which the University succeeds in meeting students’ library needs. While the administration, faculty, and staff of the Colgate University Libraries are pleased with a strong performance on the LibQUAL+ survey, they have also studied the results with an eye to finding areas for improvement. Attention to these items has resulted in improvements to library signage and changes in out Web site.

Thanks to all who responded to the LibQUAL+ survey.

Frank Gavett
Head of Borrowing Services
Case Library

Welcome to the Library – Top Ten Survival Tips!

Welcome to all new students and faculty!  Case Library and Geyer Center for Information Technology provides a comfortable environment for study, research, collaborative work, and even coffee and relaxation. Our mission is to assist you in getting connected to research and technology help, in your discovery of useful scholarly resources, and in the creative expression of your own ideas.

For new students to get started using the Libraries, below are my top ten survival tips.

Good luck on your academic career!

Joanne A. Schneider, University Librarian and Professor in the Libraries

1. Get to know your reference librarians.

They offer expert advice on the best resources for your assignments and research. Stop by the Reference Desk on the main floor of Case Library and Geyer Center for Information Technology, make an appointment for a one-on-one research consultation, or contact them by email or chat. Budding scientists also can ask for help at the Service Desk in Cooley Science Library, McGregory Hall.

2. Bring your laptop to the library and connect quickly to the new campus wireless network called Colgate.

ITS has upgraded the wireless network over the summer. See how fast it is. Check out the link above to find how to best configure your laptop and, remember, calling x7111 will connect you to the ITS HelpLine.

3. Or, use the computers in the libraries.

The two libraries provide you with over 140 computers for your use. They include both PCs and Macintoshes and some have specialized software for editing audio and video or to help students with disabilities.  Also, check out the new Hargrove Grover Digital Learning and Media Center in Case-Geyer for digital media work and help.

4. Read a good book.

Or ebook. Or enjoy a CD or DVD by simply requesting them from LASR (Library Automated Storage and Retrieval system) through the Encore online catalog.

5. Find a quiet place.

Levels two and four in Case Library are ‘quiet zones’ with many study carrels and tables. Cooley Science Library provides space that is quiet and cozy.

6. Keep up to speed on new assignments.

Locate materials for your courses placed on reserve by your professors at http://exlibris.colgate.edu/borrowing/reserves-student.html.  Also, check out the Libraries’ ‘Information for Students’ web page to find information on using the library catalog, check out course and subject guides, request materials from other libraries through MyInterlibraryLoan, and get many of your questions about the library answered.

7. Get organized!

The Assignment Calculator will help you create a timeline for successfully completing your work on time. Another online resource for citations, RefWorks, will help you build your own database of references for creating a bibliography when writing a research paper.

8. Connect from your dorm room.

Connect to library databases from anywhere on campus. Find out how to connect from off campus.

9. Test your ‘information literacy’ skills.

Get ahead of the crowd by using the Beginning Research at Colgate online tool to help you learn how to best find and critically evaluate information sources.

10. Check out the group studies for collaborative work.

Case-Geyer has ten group studies, some outfitted as digital viewing & listening rooms, available as on-demand reserved spaces with information available at Rooms and Their Use.

Library-ITS CEL Collaboration Supports Digital Research and Media

CEL Summer Video Narrative Workshop rescheduled for August 10 and 13.  Contact Debbie Krahmer, Learning Commons Librarian, at dkrahmer@colgate.edu or Sarah Kunze, Academic Liaison Technologist, skunze@colgate.edu.

The Collaboration for Enhanced Learning (CEL) website provides information on coordinated support available to faculty who wish to rethink courses and curricular approaches using current and emerging technologies to enhance student learning and engagement with information.   Information on past projects and resource documents regarding the process utilized – setting objectives, determining an assessment rubric, and identifying roles and workflow – is available there as well.

Members:

  •  Charlotte Droll, Chair, Reference and Instruction, Libraries – co-convener
  • Rich Grant, Assoc. Director of Technology Planning, ITS
  • Jesse Henderson, Visual Resources Curator, Art & Art History Dept.
  • Debbie Krahmer, Learning Commons Librarian, Libraries
  • Sarah Kunze, Instructional Technology Analyst, ITS
  • Ray Nardelli, Interim Director, Academic Technologies, ITS – co-convener
  • Peter Rogers, Information Literacy and Social Sciences Librarian, Libraries
  • Peter Tagtmeyer, Science Librarian, Libraries (will join in Fall 2012)
  • Dan Wheeler, Senior Instructional Technology Analyst, ITS

CEL Project Criteria and Components

1. Curricular and/or research-related
2. Librarian and ITS member collaborate on project
3. Engagement with technology and engagement with information
4. Commitment from the faculty member (to sustain, promote, share in the work)
5. Scalability/sustainability/mappable to other disciplines
6. Necessary resources are available (equipment, time, knowledge)

Project Components:

1. Learning goals
2. Assignment text
3. Milestones throughout the project
4. Training required for both faculty and student
5. Curricular assessment criteria (rubric)
6. Project assessment criteria (questionnaire/focus group/etc.)
7. Promo strategy – write article, create video
8. Archive strategy – portfolio for projects completed
9. Lessons learned and Recommendations

 Joanne A. Schneider
University Librarian and Professor
Colgate University Libraries
13 Oak Drive
Hamilton, NY 13346
315-228-7362 voice
315-228-7934 fax
jschneider@colgate.edu

Explore Colgate’s Digital History

 

The Libraries have begun to digitize archival collections of interest to students, faculty, alumni, and others in order to best support the curriculum and to make Colgate history more broadly accessible.  No longer is such material available only in the rarified confines of the Libraries Special Collection and University Archives reading room.

 Information has never been stable. That may be a truism, but it bears pondering. It could serve as a corrective to the belief that the speedup in technological change has catapulted us into a new age, in which information has spun completely out of control. I would argue that the new information technology should force us to rethink the notion of information itself. It should not be understood as if it took the form of hard facts or nuggets of reality ready to be quarried out of newspapers, archives, and libraries, but rather as messages that are constantly being reshaped in the process of transmission. Instead of firmly fixed documents, we must deal with multiple, mutable texts.

 From Darnton, Robert.  (June 12, 2008)  “The Library in the New Age,” The New York Review of Books.  Retrieved from http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2008/jun/12/the-library-in-the-new-age/?page=2, September 19, 2011

Joanne A. Schneider
University Librarian and Professor in the University Libraries

Colgate’s LASR Featured in Sept. 15 Library Journal

Library Journal’s cover story called “Robot Visions”  features LASR – Library Automated Storage and Retrieval System – in Colgate’s Case Library and Geyer Center for Information Technology.  Technology editor David Rapp visited Case-Geyer in early August, intrigued by LASR’s robotic solution for storage.  This pre-eminent periodical for news and trends in libraries describes how more academic libraries are embracing robotic retrieval system to address problems of storage space, and costs – and are creating transformed library spaces for patrons in the process.Colgate is one of only two dozen libraries worldwide with this robotic technology.

Joanne  A. Schneider
University Library and Professor in the University Libraries

Library-ITS CEL Collaboration Supports Digital Research and Media

The Collaboration for Enhanced Learning (CEL) website provides information on coordinated support available to faculty who wish to rethink courses and curricular approaches using current and emerging technologies to enhance student learning and engagement with information.   Information on past projects and resources documents regarding the process utilized – setting objectives, determining an assessment rubric, and identifying roles and workflow – is available there as well.

Members:

  • Charlotte Droll, Chair, Reference and Instruction, Libraries – co-convener
  • Rich Grant, Assoc. Director of Technology Planning, ITS
  • Jesse Henderson, Visual Resources Curator, Art & Art History Dept.
  • Debbie Krahmer, Learning Commons Librarian, Libraries
  • Sarah Kunze, Instructional Technology Analyst, ITS
  • Ray Nardelli, Interim Director, Academic Technologies, ITS – co-convener
  • Peter Rogers, Information Literacy and Social Sciences Librarian, Libraries
  • Peter Tagtmeyer, Science Librarian, Libraries (will join in Fall 2012)
  • Dan Wheeler, Senior Instructional Technology Analyst, ITS

CEL Project Criteria and Components

1. Curricular and/or research-related
2. Librarian and ITS member collaborate on project
3. Engagement with technology and engagement with information
4. Commitment from the faculty member (to sustain, promote, share in the work)
5. Scalability/sustainability/mappable to other disciplines
6. Necessary resources are available (equipment, time, knowledge)

Project Components:

1. Learning goals
2. Assignment text
3. Milestones throughout the project
4. Training required for both faculty and student
5. Curricular assessment criteria (rubric)
6. Project assessment criteria (questionnaire/focus group/etc.)
7. Promo strategy – write article, create video
8. Archive strategy – portfolio for projects completed
9. Lessons learned and Recommendations

Joanne A. Schneider
University Librarian and Professor
Colgate University Libraries
13 Oak Drive
Hamilton, NY 13346
315-228-7362 voice
315-228-7934 fax
jschneider@colgate.edu

Beginning Research at Colgate

Welcome first-year students! Visit the Beginning Research at Colgate site to learn about doing research here at Colgate! This guide, developed for the Class of 2015,  provides an overview of basic research concepts and recommends starting points for finding materials for your coursework. We suggest that you read through the site when you first arrive and then use it to find the answers to questions you may have as you proceed with your academic work.  Feel free to contact a librarian if you have any questions. Good luck with your work.

Joanne A. Schneider

University Librarian and

Professor in the University Libraries

 

Digital Learning and Media at Case-Geyer

Visit the Collaboration for Enhanced Learning (CEL) website to learn about support for faculty who wish to use scholarly content and media in their teaching.

Also, the Library’s Digital Collections website provides descriptions about collections that our librarians have digitally curated to support the Colgate’s  curriculum and community interests.

 Joanne A. Schneider
University Librarian and Professor
Colgate University Libraries
13 Oak Drive
Hamilton, NY 13346
315-228-7362 voice
315-228-7934 fax
jschneider@colgate.edu